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Make the most of your giving

Drew Stackel

Drew StackelWhen Drew Stackel wanted to reinforce the role of philanthropy in his adult children's lives, he suggested they to introduce him to their favorite charities. "I asked them to tell me about the charity's mission, who it helps and how it spends money," says the retired oil company engineer.

Stackel received a similar introduction to Americares. His employer, ExxonMobil, sent a list of company gift-matching charities that were responding to the devastating tsunami disaster in Southeast Asia. Stackel saw Americares on the list, researched its mission and efficiency and has been a regular supporter ever since. "I was super impressed with how Americares can leverage each dollar into $20 of benefits for people in need," says Stackel, "plus Americares has the ability to project resources into a disaster area so quickly."

Giving is important to Drew and his wife, Liz, who live in the Houston area. "It's our duty to help those who cannot always help themselves," he says, "especially if you have been blessed with the means and interest."

Including Americares in their estate plan was natural for the Stackels, who have four children. He sees it as another way to introduce philanthropy to younger generations. "We view it as an extension of our willingness to help others," says Stackel. "If you can set an example for your children, grandchildren and people with knowledge of your estate by including charities in your plan, then essentially you are serving as a role model."